Having just moved of course I packed at least 1000 boxes and during this process  I discovered one of my favorite Italian words was “soggiorno” which means living room.  I guess there is something about the double “g’s.”  It just felt so fun to write that word. Read More

Today’s language lesson does not involve any new vocabulary or verb conjugations or rolling of the r’s. Read More

This past weekend and maybe the upcoming weekend (for rebels looking to vacation right up until the last-minute), is known as the “rientro.” When using this word as it relates to vacation, it would mean, “returning home” or “going home.”  Everyone hates this word because it means a return to the routine life.  The end of the summer fun.  And as you might recall, Italians really know how to do summer up right.

And apparently, there is even and illness related to the return, appropriately called, “Sindrome da Rientro”  (Return Syndrome).  Yes – La Stampa, a daily Italian newspaper wrote an article about this illness.  The symptoms are:  anxiety, insomnia, nervousness, excessive fatigue and even mild depression.   Those who suffer from this illness are unable to concentrate and feel crushed by the sense of responsibility.  Some of the remedies include getting enough rest and physical activity.  Proper nutrition is also fundamental.  And don’t forget about that traumatic transition from sunlight to the artificial light of the office which can put stress on the mind and body. A good tip: take your lunch break outdoors.

Anyway, if you are curious about the different ways to express this horrible time of year in Italian, here below are some key words and phrases.

buon rientro dalle vacanze:  Have a good/safe trip home.  

rientro dalle vacanze:  return from vacation

rientro dalle ferie:  return from holiday

rientro:  return, re-entry

rientro al lavoro:  return to work

traffico:  traffic – Il traffico will always be the headline story for the evening news during this period as they discuss “il reintro.” Think about it – you have half the country moving on the same weekend, usually headed from south to north.  Traffic can be a nightmare.

Italian Traffic

Lately I have been catching some fun photos of gli anziani – seniors.  Most anziani are nonni – grandparents.  Grandparents play a very important part in Italian culture.  This usually comes in the form of giving out insightful advise, Sunday dinners,  spoiling grandchildren but even raising their grandchildren. Read More

 

Fall is here – and I admit (to every Italian’s horror) that it is my favorite time of year.  Maybe it has something to do with growing up in Texas where boiling hot summers lasts for at LEAST five months. Read More

Language lunedi’ – La Famiglia

It has been ages since I put up a language post.  But having just returned from visiting my family, I thought what could be more appropriate than a little lesson related to center of Italian life:  la famiglia? Read More

Well, the real reason today’s language lesson is tech talk is only because I heard this word on the radio this morning:

Tweetato. Read More

Since this past weekend was the weekend of love, I got to thinking about how we express the emotion of love in English and in Italian because at times they are slightly different.  So today is all about love! Read More

Language Lunedi’ – Telling Time

This seems like an easy lesson right?  And it is, but keep in mind that Italians typically express time using the 24 hour clock (military time) as opposed to a 12 hour clock.

Let’s begin with some standard questions and answers: Read More

There has been a lot of weather talk going on in my family lately.  There is my sister in NYC, us here, another sis in Dubai and yet another sis deep in the heart of Texas 🙂

Oddly enough they got snow in Texas a week ago…or…ok…maybe some frost…but still….classes were canceled at all the schools for this “snow day.”  Meanwhile my sis in NYC is a human popsicle.  Yesterday, it was like spring here even though we live about 2 seconds from the Alps and  my sis in the desert got some rain a week or two ago.

So let’s talk about the weather in Italian.  Below are some standard weather phrases:

Read More