Today’s language lesson does not involve any new vocabulary or verb conjugations or rolling of the r’s. Read More

This past weekend and maybe the upcoming weekend (for rebels looking to vacation right up until the last-minute), is known as the “rientro.” When using this word as it relates to vacation, it would mean, “returning home” or “going home.”  Everyone hates this word because it means a return to the routine life.  The end of the summer fun.  And as you might recall, Italians really know how to do summer up right.

And apparently, there is even and illness related to the return, appropriately called, “Sindrome da Rientro”  (Return Syndrome).  Yes – La Stampa, a daily Italian newspaper wrote an article about this illness.  The symptoms are:  anxiety, insomnia, nervousness, excessive fatigue and even mild depression.   Those who suffer from this illness are unable to concentrate and feel crushed by the sense of responsibility.  Some of the remedies include getting enough rest and physical activity.  Proper nutrition is also fundamental.  And don’t forget about that traumatic transition from sunlight to the artificial light of the office which can put stress on the mind and body. A good tip: take your lunch break outdoors.

Anyway, if you are curious about the different ways to express this horrible time of year in Italian, here below are some key words and phrases.

buon rientro dalle vacanze:  Have a good/safe trip home.  

rientro dalle vacanze:  return from vacation

rientro dalle ferie:  return from holiday

rientro:  return, re-entry

rientro al lavoro:  return to work

traffico:  traffic – Il traffico will always be the headline story for the evening news during this period as they discuss “il reintro.” Think about it – you have half the country moving on the same weekend, usually headed from south to north.  Traffic can be a nightmare.

Italian Traffic

Lately I have been catching some fun photos of gli anziani – seniors.  Most anziani are nonni – grandparents.  Grandparents play a very important part in Italian culture.  This usually comes in the form of giving out insightful advise, Sunday dinners,  spoiling grandchildren but even raising their grandchildren. Read More

 

Today I ran into a friend I have not seen in a long time.  In Italy usually your friends greet you with the double kiss – one on each side of the cheek.  But since she is Swiss,  she gave me three kisses (because apparently the Swiss do three kisses).  Read More

 

My dear friend Alida over at My Little Italian Kitchen recently interviewed me for her blog.    She is an Italian living in England and wanted my perspective of an American living in Italy.  She asked me about some of the challenges I encountered when I first moved to Italy.   Read More

This morning my kid woke up with a horrific cough.  We decided to give him some cough syrup.  Here were the options: Read More

 

This will be me for the next few weeks.  What does the sign mean?  Well, you will usually see some type of sign that says “Chiuso per Ferie” on most family run cafes, stores and restaurants for at least a few weeks in August if not the whole month. Read More

Procter & Gamble conducted a study in 2006 on the number of hours per week women around the world cleaned.  Read More

When I first moved to Italy, people were constantly stealing from me – my wallet from my purse, money from my coat pocket, countless phones from my backpack.  Read More

10 Signs You Lived in Italy in a Past Life

Great post by the blog:  Live Like an Italian.  Spot on!  Number 6 was my favorite!

Live Like an Italian

1. Your hands are as important as your words. Everything you say is punctuated with a perfectly orchestrated hand motion.  Crazy weekend? You recount it with a flourish of the wrist.  Difficult boss? A shake of the fist. Don’t understand what someone wants? Purse your fingers together. Absolutely starving? Tap your tummy.  No story is complete with the hand motions that really get the point across.

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2. You dress to make an impression. Be that head-to-toe monochrome, or a perfectly fitted suit, your clothes make a statement about you.  You do not believe in sweatpants in the grocery store, unless they are designer and accessorized; and you would never leave the house without hair done and makeup perfectly applied.

3. Whatever  your shape, you work it. Most fabulous person in the room? That’s you. But you already knew that.  Your confidence is off the charts and anyone who says otherwise is crazy.

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